The ASAP Center trains organizations, health, and mental health professionals in state of the art, trauma-informed treatments for youth.

Our work focuses on treating and preventing suicidal behavior, self-harm, depression, and substance abuse. As a partner in the National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN), we use a trauma-informed approach.

Explore the pages below to learn more about our approach, current training opportunities, and how to prepare for our training program.

The ASAP Center trains organizations and health and mental health professionals in state of the art, trauma-informed treatments for youth.

Our work focuses on treating and preventing suicidal behavior, self-harm, depression, and substance abuse. As a partner in the National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN), we use a trauma-informed approach.

Explore the pages below to learn more about our approach, current training opportunities, and how to prepare for our training program.

The ASAP Center trains organizations and health and mental health professionals in state of the art, trauma-informed treatments for youth.

Our work focuses on treating and preventing suicidal behavior, self-harm, depression, and substance abuse. As a partner in the National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN), we use a trauma-informed approach.

Explore the pages below to learn more about our approach, current training opportunities, and how to prepare for our training program.

Center Treatment
Programs
Training
Opportunities
Prepare for
Training

Providing Care That Fosters Hope & Builds Strengths

Treatment for Suicide, Self-Harm & Depression
Family Intervention for Suicide Prevention (FISP):
Emergency Treatment for Suicide & Self-Harm

What:

A cognitive-behavioral youth and family centered crisis treatment for suicide and self-harm. FISP is a second generation adaptation of the Specialized Emergency Room Intervention and is included as the first session of the SAFETY Program.

Who:

FISP is provided to families with youth who have attempted suicide, engaged in self-harm behaviors, or expressed strong suicidal urges.

Where:

FISP is delivered in emergency departments, urgent care, or other settings.

Goals:

The goals of FISP include reducing risk, ensuring safety, and assisting with linkage to care in the community.

Evidence*:

Asarnow, J. R., Berk, M. S., & Baraff, L. J. (2009). Family Intervention for Suicide Prevention: A specialized emergency department intervention for suicidal youths. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 40(2), 118–125. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0012599

Asarnow, J. R., Baraff, L. J., Berk, M., Grob, C. S., Devich-Navarro, M., Suddath, R., … Tang, L. (2011). An Emergency Department Intervention for Linking Pediatric Suicidal Patients to Follow-Up Mental Health Treatment. Psychiatric Services, 62(11), 1303–1309. https://doi.org/10.1176/ps.62.11.pss6211_1303

Hughes, J. L., & Asarnow, J. R. (2013). Enhanced Mental Health Interventions in the Emergency Department: Suicide and Suicide Attempt Prevention. Clinical Pediatric Emergency Medicine, 14(1), 28–34. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cpem.2013.01.002

Evidence Related to Initial Specialized Emergency Room Intervention:

Rotheram-Borus, M. J., Piacentini, J., Cantwell, C., Belin, T. R., & Song, J. (2000). The 18-month impact of an emergency room intervention for adolescent female suicide attempters. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 68(6), 1081–1093.

Rotheram-Borus, M. J., & Bradley, J. (1991). Triage model for suicidal runaways. The American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 61(1), 122–127.

Rotheram-Borus, M. J., Piacentini, J., Van Rossem, R., Graae, F., Cantwell, C., Castro-Blanco, D., … Feldman, J. (1996). Enhancing treatment adherence with a specialized emergency room program for adolescent suicide attempters. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 35(5), 654–663. https://doi.org/10.1097/00004583-199605000-00021

Rotheram-Borus, M. J., Piacentini, J., Van Rossem, R., Graae, F., Cantwell, C., Castro-Blanco, D., & Feldman, J. (1999). Treatment adherence among Latina female adolescent suicide attempters. Suicide & Life-Threatening Behavior, 29(4), 319–331.

*Also see evidence related to SAFETY (description below), which includes the FISP as the initial session.

FISP is listed on the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s (SAMHSA) National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices. To watch a brief video about FISP, click here. To learn more about the development of the FISP, download additional information here.

General Articles on Emergency Care: 

Asarnow, J.R., Babeva, K., & Horstmann, E. (2017). The Emergency Department: Challenges and Opportunities for Suicide Prevention. Child Adolesc Psychiatr Clin N Am, 26(4). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chc.2017.05.002.

Babeva, K., Hughes, J. L., & Asarnow, J. (2016). Emergency Department Screening for Suicide and Mental Health Risk. Current Psychiatry Reports, 18(11). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11920-016-0738-6

Safe alternatives for teens & youths (SAFETY):
Outpatient Treatment for Suicide & Self-Harm

What:

SAFETY is a youth and family centered cognitive-behavioral treatment that is informed by dialectical-behavior therapy (DBT).

Who:

SAFETY is provided to families with youth who have suicidal and/or self-harm tendencies.

Duration:

SAFETY is a 12-week treatment.

Goals:

The goals of SAFETY include increasing safety, helping youth build lives that they want to live, and assisting parents and caregivers in supporting and protecting youth.

Evidence:

Asarnow, J. R., Berk, M., Hughes, J. L., & Anderson, N. L. (2015). The SAFETY Program: A Treatment-Development Trial of a Cognitive-Behavioral Family Treatment for Adolescent Suicide Attempters. Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology, 44(1), 194–203. https://doi.org/10.1080/15374416.2014.940624

Asarnow, J. R., Hughes, J. L., Babeva, K. N., & Sugar, C. A. (2017). Cognitive-Behavioral Family Treatment for Suicide Attempt Prevention: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 56(6), 506–514. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaac.2017.03.015

Hughes JL, Babeva K, & Asarnow JR. (2018, in press). The SAFETY Program: A Youth and Family Centered Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention Informed by Dialectical Behavior Therapy. In MS Berk (Ed), Evidence-Based Treatment Approaches for Suicidal Adolescents: Translating Science into Practice.  Washington DC: American Psychiatric Association Press.

Depression treatment quality improvement intervention (DTQI):
Outpatient Treatment for Depression

What:

A manualized, flexible treatment program that uses evidence-based individual and/or group cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) for youth depression, as well as medication treatment when needed.

Who:

DTQI is provided to youth with depression.

Where:

DTQI can be delivered within primary care settings through a collaborative integrated care model.

Goals:

To reduce depression and improve functioning and quality of life among youth.

Evidence:

Asarnow, J. R., Jaycox, L. H., Duan, N., LaBorde, A. P., Rea, M. M., Murray, P., … Wells, K. B. (2005). Effectiveness of a Quality Improvement Intervention for Adolescent Depression in Primary Care Clinics: A Randomized Controlled Trial. JAMA, 293(3), 311. https://doi.org/10.1001/jama.293.3.311

Asarnow, J. R., Jaycox, L. H., Tang, L., Duan, N., LaBorde, A. P., Zeledon, L. R., … Wells, K. B. (2009). Long-Term Benefits of Short-Term Quality Improvement Interventions for Depressed Youths in Primary Care. American Journal of Psychiatry, 166(9), 1002–1010. https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2009.08121909

Ngo, V. K., Asarnow, J. R., Lange, J., Jaycox, L. H., Rea, M. M., Landon, C., … Miranda, J. (2009). Outcomes for Youths From Racial-Ethnic Minority Groups in a Quality Improvement Intervention for Depression Treatment. Psychiatric Services, 60(10), 1357–1364. https://doi.org/10.1176/ps.2009.60.10.1357

DTQI (YPIC) is listed on the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s (SAMHSA) National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices.

Treatment for Substance Abuse
Substance Abuse Module (SAM) for the Family Intervention for Suicide Prevention (FISP) or Safe Alternatives for Teens & Youths (SAFETY)

What:

SAM is integrated within FISP or SAFETY and is a brief, cognitive-behavioral treatment for co-occurring suicidality and alcohol or substance use problems.

Who:

SAM is provided to youth who engage in suicidal and substance abusing behaviors.

Where:

SAM is delivered in emergency departments, urgent care, or other settings.

Goals:

The goals of SAM include reducing risk, ensuring safety, and assisting with linkage to care in the community.

Motivational Enhancement Therapy & Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (MET-CBT)

What:

MET-CBT is a treatment that focuses on increasing motivation and cognitive-behavioral skills for reducing substance abuse.

Who:

MET-CBT is provided to youth with cannabis and alcohol related problems.

Duration:

MET-CBT consists of 5-12 sessions with a therapist. MET-CBT was originally developed as a group treatment, but we disseminate it as an individual treatment.

Goals:

The main goal of MET-CBT is to motivate youth to change their behaviors surrounding substance abuse.

Evidence:

Hogue, A., Henderson, C. E., Ozechowski, T. J., & Robbins, M. S. (2014). Evidence Base on Outpatient Behavioral Treatments for Adolescent Substance Use: Updates and Recommendations 2007–2013. Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology, 43(5), 695–720. https://doi.org/10.1080/15374416.2014.915550

MET-CBT is listed on the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s (SAMHSA) National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices.

Contingency Management

What:

Contingency management is a therapeutic approach that enables parents and caregivers to use behavioral contingencies, such as incentives, to help adolescents stop or reduce substance abuse.

Who:

Contingency management can be applied by parents or caregivers of youth with substance use problems.

When:

Contingency management can be used as a stand-alone approach or used in conjunction with MET-CBT.

Goals:

The main goal of contingency management is to reduce problematic substance use among youth through enhanced monitoring and use of behavioral consequences by caregivers.

Evidence:

Hogue, A., Henderson, C. E., Ozechowski, T. J., & Robbins, M. S. (2014). Evidence Base on Outpatient Behavioral Treatments for Adolescent Substance Use: Updates and Recommendations 2007–2013. Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology, 43(5), 695–720. https://doi.org/10.1080/15374416.2014.915550

Stanger, C., Budney, A. J., Kamon, J. L., & Thostensen, J. (2009). A randomized trial of contingency management for adolescent marijuana abuse and dependence. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 105(3), 240–247. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2009.07.009

Adoption-Specific Psychotherapy (ADAPT)
ADAPT

What:

ADAPT is a manualized psychosocial treatment that specifically addresses the needs of families with adopted children.

Who:

ADAPT is provided to adoptive parents and their children.

Duration:

ADAPT consists of seven core modules, with each module including 2-5 sessions. For youth who have histories of trauma, there is an optional module that specializes in trauma treatment.

Goals:

The goal of ADAPT is to improve family cohesiveness and quality of family interactions for adoptive families.

Evidence:

The effectiveness of ADAPT for families adopting youth from foster care is currently being tested in a randomized trial.

Other Treatment & Prevention Programs
Trauma-Informed Care

What:

Trauma-informed approaches are integrated into all ASAP Center Treatments and are an integral part of helping children who have experienced traumatic stress. Trauma-Informed Care engages youth and their families, identifies the presence and impact of trauma symptoms, and understands the impact that trauma has played in current and past challenges in order to respond and prevent re-traumatization.

Who:

Trauma-Informed Care is used when assessing all youth, and continues throughout treatment for youth who have experienced or witnessed a traumatic or stressful situation.

Where:

Trauma-Informed Care can be applied by providers in all treatment environments.

Goals:

Trauma-Informed Care aims to prevent, recognize, and respond to trauma-related difficulties in ways that promote recovery and adaptive functioning and development.

More Information:

National Child Traumatic Stress Network

The ASAP Center is currently offering training in treatments for suicide, self-harm, depression, and adoption-specific psychotherapy. As a partner in the National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN), we use a trauma-informed approach. We are currently developing training in treatments for substance abuse.

Current Trainings Emphasize:
Family intervention for suicide prevention (FISP)
Safe alternatives for teens and youths (SAFETY)
Depression treatment quality improvement (DTQI)
Adoption-Specific Psychotherapy (ADAPT)

We work closely with our collaborators to ensure that we can help them adequately meet the needs of their organizations, patients, and communities.

This process involves:

  1. Pre-training planning calls
  2. Specialized training through in-person trainings and other training resources
  3. Follow-up consultation calls throughout the implementation process

To express interest in collaborating with our Center, send us an email.

The ASAP Center is dedicated to helping our collaborators understand and prepare for our training program. Explore the process in detail below.

Explore the process in detail below.

Prepare
Step1
A crucial first step!

Start by assessing the feasibility of implementing this training program and determine whether the program meets your organization’s needs.

Learn about the program

Questions to consider:

  • Will this program meet our needs?
  • How does the program fit within the guidelines or requirements of our agency?
Identify a leadership team

Questions to consider:

  • What is our “shared vision”?
  • Who are the key leaders who will champion training and implementation?
  • Are administrators and supervisors willing and able to support and encourage training and implementation?

Leadership Team Worksheets available on request.

Complete an organizational needs assessment

Questions to consider:

  • What are the goals of our organization?
  • What are the needs of our organization?
  • What training and services gaps exist in our organization?

Organizational needs assessment worksheets available upon request.

Plan
Step2
A clear plan for moving forward can prevent future frustrations!

Develop a training plan

Questions to consider:

  • Who will be trained?
  • How much time can we allocate for in-person training?
  • How much time can we allocate for follow-up trainings or consultation calls?
  • What should the role of supervisors be in training?
Develop a clinical implementation and evaluation plan

Questions to consider:

  • How do we identify youth and families who could benefit from the treatment?
  • How will client outcomes be monitored and evaluated?
  • How do we determine when clients should be referred to other or additional services?
  • What will the aftercare plan be after the treatment has ended?
Develop a sustainability plan

Questions to consider:

  • What is our plan for sustaining the treatment after trainings and consultation calls from the ASAP Center have ended?
  • Will new staff be trained in the treatment?
  • Will any existing staff be trained to train new staff and conduct booster trainings?
Trouble shoot barriers and potential problems

Questions to consider:

  • What problems are likely to come up?
  • What issues have come up in implementing new programs in the past?
  • What is needed to promote comfort, competence, and feelings or safety in the training process?
  • What is needed to promote comfort, competence, and feelings of safety in using a new treatment program?
Train
Step3
Now that you have a strong plan, it is time to begin the trainings.

Steps
  • Train staff
  • Evaluate training
  • Trouble shoot barriers and potential problems
Launch
Step4
Your team is trained and ready; it is time to begin delivering care!

Steps
  • Identify youth and families who could benefit from the treatment
  • Deliver the treatment
  • Support clinicians in delivering the treatment
  • Monitor and evaluate outcomes for clients, families, clinicians, and the organization
  • Trouble shoot barriers and problems
Sustain
Step5
Keep it going!

Steps
  • Implement sustainability plan
  • Continue to evaluate program outcomes
  • Trouble shoot barriers and potential problems
  • Engage in continuing quality improvement
  • Use information from evaluation to improve program quality
  • Use information from evaluation to enhance benefits for organization